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September 2017 Letter to Investors

September was a solid month for the Dividend Growth portfolio, as it retuned 1.02% for the month. This underperformed the 1.93% return for the S&P 500, but the portfolio also started the month with a larger-than-usual allocation to cash.

The portfolio remains moderately cash heavy, with 10% allocated to cash as of month end. But as we enter the seasonally strong November to April period, I will look to get fully invested over the course of the next month, market conditions allowing.

The true standout performers in September were our two automakers, General Motors (GM) and Ford (F), which were up 11.6% and 8.6%, respectively, in September and which have continued to push higher in the first week of October.

All I can say is that it’s about time. I’ve been writing for all of 2017 that auto stocks were one of the few true pockets of value remaining in an otherwise expensive market. Furthermore, while sales were on pace to underperform 2016, I believed that any cyclical weakness would be minor. Frankly, the existing stock of automobiles on American roads is old and in need of being replaced. (The average age of an American car is now 12 years).

Furthermore, the threats posed by ride sharing services like Uber and by driverless cars – while real – are very long-term in nature and more than priced in at current levels. And finally, automakers are in their best financial shape in years and more than capable of powering through any industry downturn.

All of this was as true in January as it is today. But what forced Mr. Market to sit up and pay attention was Hurricane Harvey.

We may never know the exact figures, but as many as a million cars were estimated to have been severely damaged by Hurricane Harvey. As those cars are replaced, the buying will essentially mop up the excess inventory that has been worrying investors.

I’m far less interested in the “Harvey story” and far more interested by the fact that both General Motors and Ford are cheap stocks that pay safe, above-market dividends. But I’ll gladly take the portfolio returns, no matter where they might come from.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t all sunshine and roses last month. Bond yields climbed throughout the month, which rattled the REIT sector and some of our REIT holdings; STORE Capital (STOR), VEREIT (VER) and WP Carey (WPC) all lost ground in September and were a drag on performance.

My view of the REIT sector remains unchanged. So long as long-term bond yields remain range-bound, REITs offer an attractive income alternative. And retail REITs in particular offer value that is harder to come by in other subsectors of the REIT market.

I intend to opportunistically add new money to our REIT holdings on any further weakness, as I consider all to be very attractive at current prices.

Disclosures: Long GM, F, STOR, VER, WPC

Disclaimer: This material is provided for informational purposes only, as of the date hereof, and is subject to change without notice. This material may not be suitable for all investors and is not intended to be an offer, or the solicitation of any offer, to buy or sell any securities nor is it intended to be investment advice. You should speak to a financial advisor before attempting to implement any of the strategies discussed in this material. There is risk in any investment in traded securities, and all investment strategies discussed in this material have the possibility of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The author of the material or a related party will often have an interest in the securities discussed. Please see Full Disclaimer for a full disclaimer.

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Dividend Growth Portfolio August 2017 Performance and Outlook

August was an unusual month. We had escalating nuclear tensions with North Korea, and a storm – Hurricane Harvey – that will likely go down in history as the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history once the damages are tallied.

Yet perhaps shockingly, the stock market remained surprisingly quiet. Volatility ticked up modestly from its summer doldrums, but the S&P 500 managed to finish the month flat, up 0.1%.

The Dividend Growth portfolio finished the month down slightly, giving up 0.28% after fees and expenses. Year to date, the Dividend Growth portfolio was up 6.7% compared to 10.4% for the S&P 500 [Note: All returns data calculated by Interactive Brokers as of 8/31/2017; past performance no guarantee of future results].

I made several portfolio moves in August to better position the portfolio for the remainder of 2017.

To start, I took partial profits in oil and gas tanker operator Teekay Corporation (TK). Teekay’s stock price has been volatile in 2017 (along with energy prices), and I have been adding to the position when it reaches the lower end of its wide trading range and taking partial profits when it reaches the upper end of that range. While I expect Teekay to go much higher from current levels, I also intend to continue opportunistically trading the shares as conditions allow.

Following the announcement of a major dividend hike, I added shares of Citigroup (C) in August. The financial sector stands to benefit from several very favorable trends in the coming years. To start, while I don’t expect the Federal Reserve to be particularly aggressive in raising short-term interest rates, I do expect rates to go at least modestly higher. All else equal, higher interest rates and stronger economic growth mean higher profits for banks.

But beyond this, the large banks are one of the few true remaining pockets of value in a market that seems to get more expensive by the day. Citi trades for just 90% of book value and at a modest 11 times expected 2017 earnings.

Citi doubled its dividend last month after passing the Fed’s stress test. But even after the hike, Citi only pays out about 25% of its profits as dividends, so there is plenty of room to grow the dividend further.

Additionally, I sold three positions – Prospect Capital (PSEC), Main Street Capital (MAIN) and GameStop Corp (GME) – and have decided to keep the proceeds in cash for now.  While I do not believe a major stock-market correction is imminent, we are entering the September – October window when the market tends to be a little more volatile, and I felt it prudent to keep a little more cash on hand than usual. Assuming no unexpected developments, I will look to redeploy the capital within the next two months.

Prospect Capital’s performance has been below expectations for the past two quarters and, expecting a dividend cut, I decided it made sense to sell the shares. Prospect Capital did ultimately cut its dividend, vindicating my decision to sell.

After the post-dividend-cut selling, Prospect now sits at a very attractive 28% discount to book value, meaning the company is worth more dead than alive. I’m evaluating Prospect for re-entry and expect to make a decision in the coming weeks.

My decision to sell Main Street was based less on fear and more on opportunity cost. Main Street trades at a large premium to its peers in the business development company space, and at current prices, I don’t see a lot of upside left in Main Street, so it made since to sell and keep a little extra cash on hand to take advantage of any buying opportunities in September and October.

And finally, I believe that GameStop’s recent subpar performance is mostly due to negative sentiment towards brick-and-mortar retailers – negative sentiment that I consider extreme and overdone. Nevertheless, I see no immediate catalyst to send the stock higher. So, for now, I’m comfortable selling the stock and reevaluating it a few months from now.

That’s going to wrap it up for this month.

Thanks, as always, for trusting me with your hard-earned capital.

Charles Lewis Sizemore, CFA

Disclosures: Long TK, C

Disclaimer: This material is provided for informational purposes only, as of the date hereof, and is subject to change without notice. This material may not be suitable for all investors and is not intended to be an offer, or the solicitation of any offer, to buy or sell any securities nor is it intended to be investment advice. You should speak to a financial advisor before attempting to implement any of the strategies discussed in this material. There is risk in any investment in traded securities, and all investment strategies discussed in this material have the possibility of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The author of the material or a related party will often have an interest in the securities discussed. Please see Full Disclaimer for a full disclaimer.

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Dividend Growth Returns Year to Date

It didn’t get off to a good start. But 2016 is shaping up to be a fine year for the Dividend Growth portfolio.

Graph

Source: http://covestor.com/sizemore-capital/dividend-growth Data as of June 3, 2016. Past performance no guarantee of future results.

Through June 3, the Dividend Growth portfolio was up 17.3% in 2016, including dividends and allowing for a 1.5% management fee. That compares to a 2.7% return for the S&P 500. And Dividend Growth generated those returns while actually taking less risk than the S&P 500. The portfolio had a beta of 0.95 and an R-squared of 0.60, meaning that only 60% of my portfolio’s returns were explained by movements in the S&P 500.

Portfolio

Source: http://covestor.com/sizemore-capital/dividend-growth Data as of June 3, 2016. Past performance no guarantee of future results.

Much of the outperformance in 2016 can be attributed to the portfolio’s allocation to REITs (about 22%) and MLPs (about 15%). So the portfolio’s continued performance will depend on the performance of these sectors. Given that I consider these sectors to be rare pockets of value in an otherwise expensive market, I’m optimistic on that count.

Charles Sizemore is the principal of Sizemore Capital, a wealth management firm in Dallas, Texas.

Disclaimer: This material is provided for informational purposes only, as of the date hereof, and is subject to change without notice. This material may not be suitable for all investors and is not intended to be an offer, or the solicitation of any offer, to buy or sell any securities nor is it intended to be investment advice. You should speak to a financial advisor before attempting to implement any of the strategies discussed in this material. There is risk in any investment in traded securities, and all investment strategies discussed in this material have the possibility of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. The author of the material or a related party will often have an interest in the securities discussed. Please see Full Disclaimer for a full disclaimer.

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